Posts Tagged ‘African-American Orthodox’

…is a talk being given in Detroit by an Orthodox deacon, a convert from Catholicism, Saturday evening.  It’s sponsored by that area’s chapter of the Brotherhood of St. Moses the Black, and Detroit’s Council of Orthodox Christian Churches.  Details here (link will eventually break).

Advertisements

has a website!  They’re an Orthodox, largely-African-American fellowship with a mission:

“The Brotherhood of St Moses the Black is a pan-Orthodox nonprofit organization. Its mission is to minister to Americans the gift of Orthodoxy. In an effort to be good stewards of the manifold grace of God (I Peter 4:10), the organization presents an annual conference that targets those who have little exposure to Orthodoxy as well as the African roots of Orthodoxy. Its vision is to bring Americans closer to Jesus Christ.”

PS: Calling dark-skinned Africans “Blacks” goes back to ancient Greek times apparently.  St. Moses is also known as “St. Moses the Ethiopian.”

PPS: Although they use the common term Brotherhood, they also have women members.

PPPS: It’s not a religious order; it seems to have clergy, monastics, and laity involved, and to be led by a priest and a laywoman.

I just came upon the NY Times obituary for Fr. David Kirk of Emmaus House/Harlem in New York City, who reposed last May 23, the week before Pentecost.  The obit is reproduced at Wikipedia. More details at The OCAThis seems to be a website archive/homage of him.  There’s quite a bit about him through Google, including a National Public Radio report after his death.  Memories of him from Fr. John Garvey in the journal of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship, as well as from Albert and Julia Raboteau (see below).

Emmaus House/Harlem continues as a broad community of (formerly) homeless people and others with them – sounding very much like the Catholic Worker movement of Dorothy Day with which/whom Fr. David was also associated – including Albert Raboteau (sometimes officially referred to as Al Raboteau), an Orthodox professor of religion at Princeton University and African-American convert from Catholicism, and his wife Julia.

Emmaus House needs money and other material help, as well as prayers and solidarity.